Allergy & Asthma Center, PC

Welcome

Allergy & Asthma Center, P.C., is an allergy practice based in Eugene and Corvallis, Oregon.

Our practice includes allergists:

Appointments are available in the following locations in Oregon:

An allergist is a physician trained to diagnose, treat, and manage asthma and allergies, whether they are related to or caused by foods, environmental factors (such as pollen), drugs, or topical substances. Conditions that an allergist commonly treats include the following:

Important information regarding Insurance Coverage for Allergy and Asthma Care




For your information, each month we feature a topic of interest to our readers. Please read our current Topic of the Month below. To read previous articles that we have featured, please visit our Topic of the Quarter page.


Topic of the Quarter
May 2016

If you have asthma, the airways in your lungs are usually inflamed. During an asthma flare-up these airways get even more swollen, and the muscles around the airways can tighten. This can trigger wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, and shortness of breath.

An allergist/immunologist, often referred to as an allergist, has specialized expertise to clearly identify your asthma triggers and to develop a treatment plan that can minimize flare-ups and improve your quality of life.

Common Asthma Triggers

Asthma Medications

Asthma is a chronic disease, so it requires ongoing management. This includes using proper medications to prevent and control symptoms and to reduce airway inflammation.

There are two general classes of asthma medications, quick-relief and long-term controller medications. Your allergist may recommend one or a combination of two or more of these medications.

Quick-relief medications are used to provide temporary relief of symptoms and, at times, used before exercise. These rescue medicines are bronchodilators, which help to open up the airways so that more air can flow through. Bronchodilators are primarily short-acting beta-agonists administered by an inhaler or a nebulizer machine. Another type of medicine called an anticholinergic may be used at times.

Long-term controller medications are important for may people with asthma, and are taken on a daily basis to control airway inflammation and treat symptoms in people who have frequent asthma symptoms.

Inhaled corticosteroids and leukotriene modifiers can help control the inflammation that occurs in the airways of most people who have asthma. One medication may work better for you than another. Your allergist can help guide you.

Inhaled long-acting beta-agonists are symptom controllers that open your airways.

Current recommendations are for them to be used only along with inhaled corticosteroids.

Leukotriene modifiers are typically used to open airways.

Methylxanthines can help open the airways and may have a mild anti-inflammatory effect. Theophylline is the most frequently used methylxanthine. Blood levels of theophylline need to be monitored.

Omalizumab is an injectable antibody that helps block allergic inflammation. It is used in certain patients with severe persistent allergic asthma.

Asthma Management Plan

The better informed you are about your condition, the better control you will have over your asthma symptoms. To assist, you and your allergist will develop a personalized management plan. This plan includes:

Together, you and your allergist can work to ensure that asthma interferes with your daily life as little as possible.

Health Tips

Reprinted with permission from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology